The harbor boardwalk is growing.



“The bricks are already on site,” local developer Claude Perry told The Log.



With plans on file at City Hall, Perry will be putting down about 150-feet of brick pavers from Dockside Oyster Bar on the west to the Howard Group’s parcel (near KJ’s) on the east. Currently, boardwalk strollers have to walk across a gravel stretch before reconnecting with the boardwalk on the other side.



Perry has already made improvements to his parcels, which included the completion of a ramp on the western boundary near the East Pass Marina, which generated complaints about ADA compliance.



City officials say that since the pavers will be placed on top of an “impervious surface,” stormwater improvements will be made on site.



Perry was one of the few property owners along the harbor that held out of the original project and didn’t sign an easement agreement allowing the city to build on his property.



He was critical of the boardwalk project, telling The Log in the past that building the boardwalk before addressing parking concerns was like “putting the cart before the horse.”



“My concern is that the full potential of the boardwalk cannot be reached until the parking garages that were promised are completed,” Perry told The Log recently.



“We built the boardwalk to try and get people back to the harbor, but there needs to be more parking.”



While funding for a parking garage is something the city doesn’t have in its budget, Perry suggests that the city take a “proactive approach” by looking at possible funding through the Restore Act.



“Instead of waiting for them to decide how the funds are going to be distributed, we should say ‘this is what we need,’ ” Perry said.



While there is still a way to go until funds are released through the Restore Act, work along the boardwalk on Perry’s property should begin sooner rather than later as plans are currently in the review phase.