Before Tropical Storm Cindy, there were 37 turtle nests in Walton County and five in Okaloosa County. South Walton Turtle Watch reported at least 95 percent of its turtle nests were watched out. Emerald Coast Turtle Watch said four out their five nests got damaged.

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Turtle nesting season in the Emerald Coast had a major set back with Tropical Storm Cindy, but nesting turtles are making a comeback.

Before the storm, there were 37 turtle nests in Walton County and five in Okaloosa County. South Walton Turtle Watch reported at least 95 percent of its turtle nests were washed out. Emerald Coast Turtle Watch said four out their five nests were also damaged in the storm.

“We now have 80 marked turtle nest and hopefully we will see every egg hatch,” said Sharon Maxwell, with South Walton Turtle Watch. “We have re-staked quite a few nests and we are hopeful the ones that had water over them will still hatch.”

Maxwell said despite the tropical storm that came through, nesting is above average for the year.

“Last year, we had a total of 56 nests. So far we have 80 and they are still nesting,” she said.

Emerald Coast Turtle Watch’s Sara Gray said they now have 11 turtle nests in Okaloosa County. Eight are in Destin and three are on Okaloosa Island.

“We are watching over the ones that were washed out and another one that had standing water over it. They might hatch at the end of the month,” she said. “But the standing water will affect the hatchlings.”

Gray said they are happy with the 11 nests and are hoping to get probably two more. She also encourages people to fill in holes before leaving the beach so nesting turtles won’t fall in them.

“If you see a turtle, just leave it alone and see something cool happen,” she said. “Nine out of 10 false crawls occur when a turtle sees something they don’t like or have been interrupted. They are one of the shyest animals on Earth.”

Maxwell said beachgoers should not to use flashlights or take photos of the turtles.

“People get excited to see a turtle and take pictures. That upsets the turtle and they will crawl back to the Gulf and not lay their eggs," she said. “Just let them do what they have to do naturally.”