The previous Tropical Storm Warning from the Okaloosa/Walton County Line to north of the Suwannee River is done. Northwest Florida, however, does remain under a Wind Advisory by the National Weather Service until 7 p.m. Monday.

4 PM UPDATE

The National Hurricane Center has announced that the two Tropical Storm Warnings in effect for the state of Florida have been discontinued.

That means the previous warning from the Okaloosa/Walton County Line to north of the Suwannee River is done. Northwest Florida, however, does remain under a Wind Advisory by the National Weather Service until 7 p.m. Monday.

The other remaining Tropical Storm Warning in Florida from the Flagler/Volusia County Line to Altamaha Sound has also been discontinued.



Also discontinued are Storm Surge Warnings from Fernandina Beach southward, from the Aucilla River westward, and from Clearwater Beach southward, including Tampa Bay.

All attention now turns north as the effects of Tropical Storm Irma turn to Atlanta, Charleston, South Carolina, and eastern Alabama while the devastating storm continues its path into the Southeast U.S.

At 4 p.m., as rain and storm surge was being recorded especially in Charleston, the center of Irma was 10 miles east of Albany, Georgia, holding 50 mph winds as it moved north-northwest near 17 mph. A turn toward the northwest is expected by Tuesday morning. On the forecast track, the center of Irma will continue to move over southwestern Georgia tonight and move into Alabama on Tuesday.

Maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 50 mph with higher gusts. Continued weakening is forecast, and Irma is likely to become a tropical depression on Tuesday.

A thankful Northwest Florida says goodbye to Irma, which trended east overnight Sunday and spared the region the devastating effects felt in most of the other areas of Florida.

But the scope of the enormity of Irma is seen in the continuing rain accumulations through Wednesday:

South Carolina and north-central Georgia and Alabama into the southern Appalachians: 3 to 6 inches with isolated 10 inches.

Northern Mississippi and southern portions of Tennessee and North Carolina: 2 to 4 inches.

Isolated tornadoes are possible tonight along the South Carolina coast.

While Northwest Florida was the only region of the state spared from Irma, authorities on Monday sent an aircraft carrier and other Navy ships to help with search-and-rescue operations in Florida as a flyover of the hurricane-battered Keys yielded what the governor said were scenes of devastation.

"I just hope everyone survived," Gov. Rick Scott said.

Five deaths in Florida were blamed on Irma, along with two in Georgia. At least 34 people were killed in the Caribbean as the storm closed in on the U.S. mainland.

The Keys felt Irma's full fury when it came ashore as a Category 4 hurricane Sunday morning with 130 mph (209 kph) winds. How many people defied evacuation orders and stayed during the storm was unclear.

Statewide, more than 6.7 million homes and businesses remained without power Monday afternoon, and officials warned it could take weeks for electricity to be restored to everyone. More than 180,000 people huddled in shelters.

In the Jacksonville area, close to the Georgia line and well west of Irma's center, storm surge brought some of the worst flooding ever seen there, with at least 46 people pulled from swamped homes.

A tropical storm warning was issued for the first time ever in Atlanta, and school was canceled in communities around the state. More than 100,000 customers were without power in Georgia and over 80,000 in South Carolina.

This is the last update from the Northwest Florida Daily News.

1 PM UPDATE

As Tropical Storm Irma begins its exit from Florida and starts zeroing in on Georgia and Alabama, one of the state's two Tropical Storm warnings remains in effect locally.

In the 1 p.m. update from the National Hurricane Center, the dangerous outer bands of Irma has left a Tropical Storm Warning in place from the Okaloosa/Walton County Line east to the Suwanee River in the Big Bend Area.

The only other Tropical Storm Warning is along the Atlantic north of the Flagler/Volusia County Line to the South Santee River.

The Hurricane Center reported that tropical storm conditions will continue across portions of the central and northern Florida peninsula and southern Georgia.

At 1 p.m., tropical storm conditions were spreading into the eastern Florida Panhandle and eastern Alabama. Tropical storm conditions are also expected to spread northward across the remainder of the warning area through today.

Storm Surge Warnings are in place for Tampa Bay, the South Santee River southward to the Flagler/Volusia County Line, and North of Anna Maria Island to the Ochlockonee River.

At 1 p.m., Irma was located 55 miles east of Tallahassee and 50 miles south-southeast of Albany, Georgia, holding maximum sustained winds of 60 mph while moving 17 mph north-northwest. Up the Atlantic coastline, South Carolina was experiencing enormous flooding from the storm.

Irma's minimum central pressure has markedly increased to 980 millibars (28.94) inches.

The Hurricane Center noted that the center of Irma will continue to move over southwestern Georgia today, and move into eastern Alabama on Tuesday morning.

Continued slow weakening is forecast, and Irma is likely to become a tropical depression on Tuesday.

10 AM UPDATE

With watches and warnings being discontinued across Florida as Tropical Storm Irma zeroes in toward Tallahassee, a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect from the Okaloosa/Walton County Line east to the Anclote River north of Tarpon Springs along the Gulf of Mexico.

The Wind Advisory by the National Weather Service also remains in place for Northwest Florida until 7 p.m. Monday.

NWS noted that North winds increasing to 25 to 35 mph with frequent higher gusts are expected over parts of southwest and south-central Alabama and the western Florida Panhandle today.

There is an elevated threat of flash flooding due to heavy rainfall over parts of interior south-central Alabama north and east of a line from around Camden extending southeast down to near Andalusia.

In fact, only two advisories were posted by the Hurricane Center in its 10 a.m. report:

Storm Surge Warning

* South Santee River southward to the Flagler/Volusia County line

* North of Bonita Beach to the Ochlockonee River

* Tampa Bay

Tropical Storm Warning

* Anclote River to the Okaloosa/Walton County Line

* North of the Volusia/Brevard County line to the South Santee River

Tropical storm warnings also extend well inland to include much of Georgia, eastern Alabama, and parts of southern South Carolina, including the cities of Atlanta and Montgomery, Alabama.

Irma remains a large tropical cyclone. Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 415 miles from the center. A 60 mph sustained wind and a 69 mph gust was recently reported at the National Data Buoy Center C-MAN station in St. Augustine.

The Weather Channel reported that with more than 26 river gauges in major flood stage across northern Florida — and Jacksonville's St. Johns River reaching its highest level ever — the storm's impacts were far from over in the region.

John Ward, the emergency operations manager of Clay County, says crews have pulled 46 people from flooded homes by early Monday and an undetermined number are still stranded as the area's creeks and ponds are getting record flooding, according to an Associated Press report.

Irma is moving toward the north-northwest near 17 mph and this motion is expected to continue through Tuesday.

On the forecast track, the center of Irma will move into southwestern Georgia later today, and move into eastern Alabama on Tuesday morning.

Officials say at least one tornado has been reported in coastal Georgia as strong winds and drenching rains from Tropical Storm Irma hammer the state.

At 10 a.m. the center of the storm was located 70 miles east of Tallahassee moving north-northwest. It was still being measured with maximum sustained winds of 65 mph.

7 AM UPDATE

In the 7 a.m. report from the National Hurricane Center, a weakening Irma has been downgraded to a tropical storm, but the massive storm system is producing gusts to near hurricane force.

As Northwest Florida is seeing a definitive weather change — cooler temperatures, higher winds with a few gusts and minimal periods of light rain — there has been a change in the Hurricane Center advisory for the area.

The Hurricane Warning that was extended along the Gulf Coast to Indian Pass near Apalachicola in Gulf County has been lifted.

That area west to the Okaloosa/Walton County Line is now under a Tropical Storm Warning. That warning actually extends the entire way to Bonita Beach, located north of Naples in Bonita Springs.

As Irma barrels toward Tallahassee, its core was located 30 miles north-northeast of Cedar Key and 105 miles north-northwest of Tampa sustaining maximum winds of 70 mph.

The storm has increased speed to 18 mph with a rising minimum central pressure of 970 millibars (28.64 inches).

Irma has a very large wind field. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 60 miles mainly to the west of the center, and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 415 miles.

Well away from the center in Jacksonville, that city was experiencing major wind and rain from Irma's outer bands and the St. John River had risen significantly causing inland flooding.

Tropical storm conditions will continue across portions of the central and northern Florida peninsula, and are spreading into southern Georgia. Tropical storm conditions should spread into the eastern Florida Panhandle today. Tropical storm conditions are also expected to spread northward across the remainder of the warning areas through today.

Irma is expected to produce the following rain accumulations through Wednesday:

The Florida Keys and southern Florida peninsula: additional 1 inch.

Central Florida peninsula: additional 1 to 3  nches.

Northern Florida peninsula and southern Georgia: additional 3 to 6 inches with storm total amounts of 8 to 15 inches.

Central Georgia, eastern Alabama and southern South Carolina: 3 to inches, isolated 10 inches.

Central Florida Panhandle, western Alabama, northern Mississippi, southern Tennessee, northern Georgia, northern South Carolina and western North Carolina: 2 to 4 inches.

A few tornadoes are possible across northeast Florida and southeast portions of Georgia and South Carolina through tonight.

The following watches and warnings were in effect at 7 a.m.:

Storm Surge Warning

—South Santee River southward to the Flagler/Volusia County line

—Cape Sable northward to the Ochlockonee River

—Tampa Bay

Tropical Storm Warning

—Bonita Beach, through Indian Pass in Gulf County to the Okaloosa/Walton County Line

—Jupiter Inlet to the South Santee River

—Lake Okeechobee

A few tornadoes are possible across northeast Florida and southeast portions of Georgia and South Carolina through tonight.

4 AM UPDATE

In the 4 a.m. report from the National Hurricane Center, the center of Hurricane Irma is forecast to bend toward the northwestern coast of the Florida Peninsula on Monday morning, cross the eastern Florida Panhandle into southern Georgia this afternoon, and move through southwestern Georgia and eastern Alabama tonight and Tuesday.

Northwest Florida is forecast to experience tropical storm conditions as the massive storm at this point, on the northeast side away from Irma's core, was drilling the Jacksonville area. Maximum sustained winds for Irma have decreased to near 75 mph with higher gusts. Additional weakening is forecast, and Irma is expected to weaken to a tropical storm this morning and to a tropical depression by Tuesday afternoon.

Hurricane warnings extend north of Jupiter Inlet on the east coast to Fernandina Beach and from Bonita Beach to Indian Pass on the Gulf Coast near Apalachicola. Hurricane warnings are also in effect well into southern Georgia. Included in the hurricane warnings are the Tampa/St. Petersburg metro, Jacksonville, Tallahassee, Thomasville and Valdosta.

Tropical storm warnings are now in effect for south Florida from Jupiter Inlet southward and around the Florida peninsula to Bonita Beach, the Florida Keys and Florida Bay. In the western Florida Panhandle, tropical storm warnings are also in effect east of the Okaloosa/Walton County Line to Indian Pass, and along the Georgia and South Carolina coasts up to the South Santee River.

Inland, tropical storm warnings extend into eastern Alabama, much of Georgia and southern South Carolina. This includes the Atlanta metro area.

Northwest Florida also remains under a Wind Advisory from the National Weather Service until 7 p.m. Monday.

Irma has a very large wind field. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 60 miles mainly to the west of the center, and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 415 miles. The Mayport Naval Station near Jacksonville recently reported sustained winds of 68 mph and a wind gust of 87 mph.

The following watches and warnings were in effect at 4 a.m.:

Storm Surge Warning

—South Santee River southward to Jupiter Inlet

—Cape Sable northward to the Ochlockonee River

—Tampa Bay

Hurricane Warning

—Sebastian Inlet to Fernandina Beach

—Anclote River to Indian Pass in Gulf County

Hurricane Watch

—North of Fernandina Beach to Edisto Beach

Tropical Storm Warning

—West of Indian Pass to the Okaloosa/Walton County Line

—North of Fernandina Beach to South Santee River

—South of Anclote River to Bonita Beach

—South of Sebastian Inlet to Jupiter Inlet

—Lake Okeechobee