Halfway through this year's spring break, the Daily News held a forum at the June White Decker Beach Access to learn how the community feels about enforcement of underage drinking laws.

Halfway through this year’s spring break, the Daily News held a forum at the June White Decker Beach Access to learn how the community feels about the enforcement of underage drinking laws. Here’s what people on the beach had to say.

Brian John, Memphis: “Carting them off to jail just for drinking underage, that’s ridiculous. This is tourism down here. A lot of these kids or their parents are paying for these rooms and condos. They’re going to have to come up with another solution.”

Chelsey John, Memphis: “It’s tricky, but nobody wants somebody driving drunk past them. An arrest is going on your record forever and can keep you from getting jobs. But at the same time, sometimes it might just take that for one of these kids to learn their lesson.”

Doug Kenyon, Destin: “It’s ridiculous. The jail is so far away. ... As far as underage drinking down here, if they’re not being a problem, don’t arrest them. I don’t like seeing people getting arrested and they shouldn’t be carting them off to Crestview.”

Shadia Ronquillo, Ecuador: “I think underage students shouldn’t drink anywhere. It’s safer for kids and families (to arrest them), and it’s a good idea that they have these rules for them. It’s not okay on the beach or in any other place. The punishment maybe should be less, but when you have rules, people learn, so maybe it’s a good thing.”

Carl Tarver, Alabama: “I think they should ticket them because the police know they’re going to be out here drinking anyways. Instead of taking them to jail right now, they should start giving them tickets and making sure there’s an adequate warning. ... They shouldn’t be shackled and taken to jail.”

Taylor Simpson, Alabama: "I don't think they should have to be taken to jail without their parents around or someone they know. In Tuscaloosa, I was taken to jail when I was 18 for underage drinking and I had to stay there for 12 hours until I sobered up. I had to pass a field sobriety test before they allowed me to make my phone call. It taught me a lesson, but it was awful and I was lucky my parents were nearby."