On Wednesday and again Thursday morning, students taking classes via Zoom, the widely used video conferencing platform, were subjected to images, rap music and vulgar language, according to School Superintendent Mike Mosley.

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NICEVILLE — Rocky Bayou Christian School’s ambitious effort to provide a full curriculum to students via computer was undermined briefly this week by a hacker.

On Wednesday and again Thursday morning, students taking classes via Zoom, the widely used video conferencing platform, were subjected to images, rap music and vulgar language, according to School Superintendent Mike Mosley.

“Two classes got Zoom bombed the first day and the next day two others,” he said.

The images appearing on student computer screens included a likeness of LeBron James, Mosley said.

Teachers who saw the hacks confirmed vulgar language but did not believe anything shown to students rose to the level of pornography, said Academy Principal Tony Clymer.

Following the second incident Thursday, the school shut down its program and contacted Zoom, Mosley said.

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At the end of a three-hour meeting the decision was made to upgrade to Zoom Prime, a paid program, and to take additional security measures like requiring passwords to enter a meeting session, he said.

The upgrade will cost the school about $15 a month per teacher, Mosley said.

The added security should allow Rocky Bayou administrators to catch any future hackers by isolating an email address, Clymer said.

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Clymer said he spoke to a Niceville Police officer who is assigned to the school and that officer had forwarded information about the hack to investigators. School officials were waiting word Friday on what, if any, type of criminal investigation would be undertaken.

“We’re doing our level best to make sure our kids are safe and we don’t have this kind of disruptions,” Clymer said.

Zoom has grown to nationwide prominence since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic and calls for social distancing. News sources quoting Zoom CEO Eric Yuan reported that the company had grown from hosting 10 million daily users in December to 200 million in March.

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But the company has been beset in recent weeks by complaints of hacking, and Yuan has pledged to take steps to tighten security and protect users.

“We did not design the product with the foresight that, in a matter of weeks, every person in the world would suddenly be working, studying, and socializing from home,” Yuan said in an article posted on the website techradar.pro. “Over the next 90 days, we are committed to dedicating the resources needed to better identify, address, and fix issues proactively.”