Allan Stearns of Fort Walton Beach writes: “I learned at that point that a military commander must make difficult or perhaps unpopular decisions that may be hard to understand initially, but were done for the good of the mission.”

Col. Prichard, your recent letter deriding the removal from the White House of Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman overlooks the fact that President Trump is still the Commander in Chief. Commanders can replace a subordinate.


When I was a second lieutenant, I came to work one morning to discover my squadron commander had been relieved the night before, by our boss, a general.


Why? Because my commander had not performed up to the expectations of the boss.


I learned at that point that a military commander must make difficult or perhaps unpopular decisions that may be hard to understand initially, but were done for the good of the mission.


Lt. Col. Vindman openly did not support his commander and questioned his boss’s decisions or ability to lead. If you had done that, Col. Prichard, when you served, you could have also been removed from your job. I did not always agree with my superior officers, but I always knew that I had a responsibility to lead, follow or get out of the way.


I realize you probably do not agree with President Trump, but he is the Commander in Chief until the next election.


By the way, the lieutenant colonel was not fired from the military. He was reassigned, just as my boss was all those many years ago.


Allan Stearns, Fort Walton Beach